BEHAVIORAL INTERVIEW

on 11:41 PM

More employers are using behavioral interviewing in the hiring process. This type of interview is based on the idea that the best way to predict your future performance is to examine your past and present performance in a similar situation. It focuses on experiences, behaviors, knowledge, skills and abilities that are job related. 

With the Behavioral interview Employers predetermine which skills are necessary for the job for which they are looking and then ask very pointed questions to determine if the candidate possesses those skills. Currently, 30 percent of all organizations are using behavioral interviewing to some degree. Prepare for Behavioral Interviews by researching what job competencies an employer might seek.

Why should you prepare for behavioral interview?

Candidates who prepare for behavioral interviews are better prepared - even for traditional interviews.
Using behavioral answers works well with inexperienced interviewers. Companies that invest the time and energy in developing behavioral interviews often attract top candidates. Top candidates make the company a more desirable place to work.

Before the interview:

One way to prepare for the interview is to first consider the job description. What skills are listed as qualifications for the job? For example, does the organization say they need team players? someone with a strong attention to detail? keen problem solvers? or someone with superior customer service? Once you have a greater understanding of the kinds of skills they are seeking, you can begin to reflect upon experiences in which you demonstrated these skills. If you don’t have a job description, think about the skills that might be necessary for the job or speak to an advisor in career services.

When answering the question:

First, internally note what competency or skill the employer may be seeking (hint: it may be more than one) and then always make sure you:
Describe a specific, recent situation (if you can, try to keep it within two years)
Detail your behavior or the actions you took to resolve the situation. (Be sure that your role is clear and significant)
Share the outcome or the results of the situation.


Feel free to draw upon your experiences within an on-campus organization or sports team, volunteer work, prior internships, classroom experience or coursework.

Some examples of Job Competencies are below:


Adaptability Equipment
Operation
Personal Effectiveness
Analysis
Fact Finding-Oral
Persuasion
Analytical Problem Solving
Financial Analytical Ability
Participative Management
Attention to Detail
Futuristic Thinking
Presentation Skills
Continuous Learning
Initiative
Risk Taking
Communication-Oral
Goal Orientation
Process Operation
Communication-Written
Impact
Rapport Building
Conflict Management
Independence
Resilience
Assertiveness
Flexibility
Practical Learning
Control
Innovation
Safety Awareness
Creativity/Innovation
Integrity
Sales/Persuasiveness
Customer Service
Interpersonal Skills
Sensitivity
Decisiveness
Leadership
Stress
Delegation
Influence
Teamwork
Entrepreneurial Insight
Planning and Organizing
Written Communication
Diplomacy
Listening
Professional Knowledge
Empathy
Management
Technical Proficiency
Employee Development
Motivation
Tenacity
Energy
Negotiation
Training
Decision Making
Judgment
Strategic Analysis

During a behavioral interview, always listen carefully to the question, ask for clarification if necessary, and make sure you answer the question completely. Your interview preparation should include identifying examples of situations from your experiences on your resume where you have demonstrated the behaviors a given company seeks.

When answering behavioral questions use the STAR Method and convey specific situations, actions, and outcomes/results.

Situation Use specific details about a situation or task.
Task Tell what led to the situation or task?
Action Taken Discuss what you did and who was involved?
Result or outcome Communicate the outcome?

Before the interview process, identify two or three of your top selling points and determine how you will convey these points (with demonstrated STAR stories) during the interview.

Whenever you can, quantify your results. Numbers illustrate your level of authority and responsibility. For example: "I was a shift supervisor." could be "As Shift Supervisor, I trained and evaluated 4 employees."

Be prepared to provide examples of when results didn't turn out as you planned. What did you do then? What did you learn? Your resume will serve as a good guide when answering these questions. Refresh your memory regarding your achievements in the past couple of years. Demonstration of the desired behaviors may be proven in many ways. Use examples from past internships, classes, activities, team involvements, community service and work experience.

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